Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Frank Miller got me thinking...



Above photo: Klaus Janson and Frank Miller at the School of Visual Arts’ “100 Years of Genius: The Life and Legacy of Will Eisner” event in April 2017. Photo by (DC Comics editor and SVA faculty member) Joey Cavalieri.

Frank Miller got me thinking.

On April 4, 2017, during his chat at the School of Visual Arts’ “100 Years of Genius: The Life and Legacy of Will Eisner,” Frank Miller talked a bit on the topic of Will Eisner and comic book Creators’ Rights. Miller explained Will’s views on comic book Creator’s Rights and contracts:

The most frequent business advice [Will Eisner] gave me was: ‘Stop whining.’ Because I would go in saying: ‘Creators’ Rights this, Creators’ Rights that, Creators’ Rights this.’ And he’d say: ‘Look, if you sign the contract, it’s over. Stop complaining about anything.’ His point of view was simply that if you’re working on other people’s material, then you don’t have that much of a claim. And so, clearly, his whole point was that the future of comics was for people to be introducing new material.

(You can watch the entirety of SVA’s “100 Years of Genius: The Life and Legacy of Will Eisner” event here on Youtube.)

In the book EISNER/MILLER, Will stated:

Take a look at the marketplace and understand what its realties are. I never subscribed to this Creators’ Bill of Rights because I believe that there was no reality to it. In the marketplace, moral rights are often disregarded.

And…

Well, there is no ingrained right, there are no God-given rights here. The rights are what you negotiate.

Now, it’s true that Will was a very savvy business person. (And you really have to be if you want to have a successful career in the arts.) I don’t think that Will would have needed to be reminded by something like (the very important) Creators’ Bill of Rights. However, the vast majority of young artists do need to be reminded and told about the Bill and about Creators’ Rights.

(I lecture on all of this in my Sequential Art: Comics Illustration class at SUNY Orange.)

In an interview on the Creators’ Bill of Rights and Creators’ Rights for THE COMICS JOURNAL (No. 137, September 1990) by Gary Groth and with Steve Bissette, Scott McCloud stated:

Whatever crimes are going on at companies where Creators’ Rights are not honored become pretty quickly irrelevant because essentially it’s your own damn fault if you decide to work there… if there is an alternative… yeah, if you went in with some knowledge. ‘What’s smoking?’ As long as the warning is there.

(A must-read and/or must-listen interview with Stephen Bissette and Scott McCloud.)

Over the years, I’ve been quite outspoken about comic book Creator’s Rights.

In 2005, I began becoming more vocal and more public about my views on Creators’ Rights. I started conversations with folks like Steve Bissette, Dave Sim, Rick Veitch, Scott McCloud, and even with Denis Kitchen, Erik Larsen, and Fernando Ruiz.

(All of these discussions are collected and posted at www.yacanteraseink.com)

Dave Sim had suggested to me that my eventual departure from Archie Comics may have been due to my public outspokenness on Creators’ Rights. Dave could very well be right.

In 2010, I officially ended my contributions toward work-made-for-hire.

(Two weeks ago, for about an hour, I was on the phone with a publisher and trying to convince him that I had no interest in working on their work-made-for-hire project.)



Above photo: This photo was taken in June 2014 during the "Creator-owned Comics (vs. Corporate-owned Comics)" panel at the Special Edition: NYC comics convention which was held at the Jacob Javits Center New York City. I was joined on the panel by Kurt Busiek and Mike Allred.

In 2014, I was on the “Creator-owned Comics (vs. Corporate-owned Comics)” panel held at the Special Edition: NYC comics convention. The panel featured a discussion between myself, Michael Allred, and Kurt Busiek. That panel pretty much summed up my view on Creators’ Rights in regards to Creator-owned Comics versus Corporate-owned Comics.

Simply put: Comic book publishers have a horrible history with treating their writers and artists. If you’re interested in playing in the work-made-for-hire sandbox, then know the environment in which you’re working and know what your rights are. For me, now, creator-owned comics are the only thing that I’ll be doing in comics.

The topic of comic book Creators’ Rights does still interest me a great deal. I still believe that, at the very least, the Creator’s Bill of Rights is a must-read for professional comic book creators and for young artists who wish to have a career in comics and/or in animation.

It’s just that, now, I don’t know if we can actually change the policies of comic book publishers that promote work-made-for-hire. Maybe it’s just best to ignore the likes of Marvel and DC. There are more creator-friendly publishers out there. Why keep flogging a dead horse?

My opinion hasn’t changed, exactly. I like to think that my focus has just evolved. I don’t care what the corporate comic publishers are doing anymore.

I’m wondering if Will Eisner was more often correct about Creators' Rights than I previously thought.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

Monday, April 24, 2017

AN ACT OF FAITH: THE SWORD OF EDEN Motion Comic...



AN ACT OF FAITH: THE SWORD OF EDEN Motion Comic...

Labels: , ,

Juiced...



I have been asked about the JUCE TV animatic. Folks can view the animatic on YouTube, as well. Here’s how Nemish-Man likes to juice his TV…

Labels: , ,

Framed...



Above: This photo was sent to me by the new owners of the original artwork to the cover of AN ACT OF FAITH #1. I am flattered...

Labels: , , ,

Thursday, March 21, 2013

AN ACT OF FAITH #2 now on sale!

Thursday, March 7, 2013

AN ACT OF FAITH now on sale!



AN ACT OF FAITH #1 is now on sale at iVerse Media and here.

AN ACT OF FAITH #1 is available on the ComicsPlus app by iVerse Media. Download the app. Each issue costs $1.99.

You can download the app at the Apple store.

If you’re not using an app and prefer to download and read the book on the web, here's a direct link to the book.

AN ACT OF FAITH is a downloadable digital comic that can be purchased through iVerse Media, and read on tablets, smart phones, and computers. Each new issue will be available every six weeks, or so.

AN ACT OF FAITH is self-published by Messianic Comics. The comic is aimed at a readership of thirteen-years of age and older.

AN ACT OF FAITH introduces readers Rebecca Stern as she begins her career as a super-hero. What will happen when our young heroine joins forces with Nemish-Man, Kid-Cockroach, and Professor Jack in retrieving the Sword of Eden (the legendary sword used by angels to keep Adam and Eve out of the Garden of Eden). In their adventures, our heroes battle demons, zombies, a bunch of ninja, and other super-villains. And how will these super-heroes cope when they must combat mythological villains such as Count Orlok or the Green Knight? If that ain’t enough, will our heroes be capable of locating Noah’s Ark?

For AN ACT OF FAITH comics news and preview artwork, stop by www.anactoffaithcomic.com.

Or visit us on Facebook.

Let me know what you think of AN ACT OF FAITH.

Thanks for reading.

Holy is Yeshua!

Labels: , ,

Saturday, December 8, 2012

"Vampires should be dusted, not hugged!"



Above: Line art for the cover to AN ACT OF FAITH #5 by me.

This past week, I’ve been working on the covers for AN ACT OF FAITH. Here’s the line art for the cover to issue five.

I suppose there’s always been a sense of romanticism associated with vampires in fiction. There’s been Bram Stoker’s DRACULA, Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau’s NOSFERATU, Bela Lugosi, and Anne Rice’s VAMPIRE CHRONICLES (I think that that’s when things started getting really weird), to name the most prominent.

Nowadays, though, things have been getting way out of hand with TWILIGHT and THE VAMPIRE DIARIES. Vampires are walking dead things. They shouldn’t be nice guys that all of the young girls want to make smoochies with. Vampires make excellent villains. They should be dusted, not hugged.

That’s going to be one of my points with AN ACT OF FAITH #5.



Isaiah 5:20 (King James Version): Woe unto them that call evil good, and good evil; that put darkness for light, and light for darkness; that put bitter for sweet, and sweet for bitter!

Labels: , ,

Friday, September 14, 2012

LETHARGIC LAD 2011...



Above: Cover to Greg Hyland’s LETHARGiC LAD 2011. Lethargic Lad and all other prominent Lethargic Lad characters are TM and © 2012 Greg Hyland.

Tired of comics that are reboots? Annoyed with comics that are the "New" that, or "Next" this, or full of "52" crap? Then, it’s time you gave up on corporate super-hero comics and paid more attention to super-hero comics that are fun.

Today, my mailbox gave me LETHARGiC LAD 2011. The book was signed, numbered, and included a keen "Holy Crap" Lethargic Lad cover sketch by cartoonist Greg Hyland. LETHARGiC LAD 2011 is nicely printed, and the widescreen format is brilliant (as always). (Greg is still very smart.)

Greg’s writing is hysterical and his artwork is sharp. (Nice inking, Mr. Hyland.) And Greg’s annotations are entertaining and informative.

With LETHARGiC LAD 2011, Greg mocks WIZARD magazine (and who really doesn’t want to?), Rebecca Black (I forget who she is), super-hero deaths in comics, DC’s ‘New 52’, and Frank Miller’s HOLY TERROR (My favorite part of the book. But unlike Greg, I did enjoy HOLY TERROR.).

If you want to read comics that are witty and fun, then you’ll love LETHARGiC LAD 2011. I did.

To order the limited edition LETHARGiC LAD 2011 and to read new weekly LETHARGiC LAD webcomics, stop by the LETHARGiC LAD website.

I give LETHARGiC LAD 2011 four out of five NM’s:

Labels: , , , , ,

Saturday, July 7, 2012

The 2012 Harvey Awards...



Below are my votes for the 2012 Harvey Awards. I didn’t vote in all of the categories. I had a tough decision to make with the "BEST CONTINUING OR LIMITED SERIES" category. I love both ATOMIC ROBO and RACHEL RISING. I did vote for RACHEL RISING for "BEST NEW SERIES."

BEST LETTERER
Chris Eliopoulous, FEAR ITSELF, Marvel Comics

BEST COLORIST
Dave Stewart, HELLBOY: THE FURY, Dark Horse

BEST SYNDICATED STRIP or PANEL
MUTTS, Patrick McDonnell, syndicated by King Features Syndicate

BEST NEW SERIES
RACHEL RISING, Abstract Studio

BEST GRAPHIC ALBUM PREVIOUSLY PUBLISHED
PS MAGAZINE: THE BEST OF PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE MONTHLY, Abrams ComicArts

BEST DOMESTIC REPRINT PROJECT
WALT SIMONSON'S THE MIGHTY THOR ARTIST'S EDITION, IDW

BEST COVER ARTIST
Mark Simpson (Jock), DETECTIVE COMICS, DC Comics

BEST BIOGRAPHICAL, HISTORICAL, or JOURNALISTIC PRESENTATION
PS MAGAZINE: THE BEST OF PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE MONTHLY, Abrams ComicArts

SPECIAL AWARD for EXCELLENCE IN PRESENTATION
WALT SIMONSON’S THE MIGHTY THOR ARTIST'S EDITION, edited by Scott Dunbier, IDW

BEST CONTINUING OR LIMITED SERIES
ATOMIC ROBO AND THE GHOST OF STATION X, Red 5 Comics



Above: And, of course, I voted for the still awesome cover to DETECTIVE COMICS #880 by Mark "Jock" Simpson.

Labels: ,

Friday, May 11, 2012

Stan Lee on Creator’s Rights...



Above: Comics legend, Stan "The Man" Lee.

In an interview, Stan Lee shares his opinions concerning comic book Creator’s Rights:

Then I ask him if he feels, in general, that the comic-book industry has been fair to comic-book creators.

"I don't know," Stan says. "I haven't had reason to think about it that much." Five-second pause. "I think, if somebody creates something, and it becomes highly successful, whoever is reaping the rewards should let the person [who] created it share in it, certainly. But so much of it is — it goes beyond creating. A lot of people put something together, and nobody really knows who created it, they're just working on it, y'know? But little by little, the artists and the writers now are a different breed than they were, and most of them, if they create anything new, they insist that they be part owners of it. Because they know what happened to Siegel and Shuster, and to me, and to people like that. I don't think it's a problem anymore. They make much more money than they used to make, when I was there. Proportionately.

"Everybody thought that I was the only one that was getting paid off, but I never received any royalties from the characters. I made a good living, because I was the editor, the art director, and the head writer. So I got a nice salary. That was all I got. I was a salaried guy. But it was a good salary. And I was happy."

Labels: , ,